Black Strobe ‘The Girl From The Bayou’

Published On February 19, 2013 | By Andrew Rafter | Featured Artist
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Black Strobe have been around since 1997 in one form or another. Fast forward to 2013 and the band (minus Ivan Smagghe) are back with a new EP and it’s a long way from the frozen balearic gay biker house they were famed for during the late 90′s and early naughties.

Having turned over classic tracks like ‘Italian Fireflies’ and ‘Me And Madonna’ to the younger generation for a remixes package last year, that chapter of the band is now over, and it’s time for Arnaud and the old band mates to reimagine the group and it’s sound.

‘The Girl From The Bayou’ is chapter one of a new story, it is sexy, smart and just the sort of music you’d expect from Rebotini, who is a self-confessed disco and blues addict. It’s the kind of French electronic pop that ooze style and class, never too showy or too banging, just simplicity at its finest blending house, disco, blues, with Arnaud’s raspy growls set against doughy backing vocals. It’s quite unlike anything you’ve probably ever heard.

Those of you who are looking for something a bit more house-y, then you should definetly check out the b-side ‘A Mojoworker’ which showcases Black Strobe’s sleezier side, with grouchy basslines backed against glassy hooks and subtle piano chords.

Following the release there’s a whole suite of remixes from some of Arnaud’s favourite new producers who reinterpret the track in a myriad ways from Crackboy’s jacking house take through to Holmes’ penthouse sex disco.

 

http://www.blackstrobe.blackstroberecords.com

 

https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/the-girl-from-the-bayou-ep/id591290949

 

About The Author

is the Editor and Founder of Harder Blogger Faster. Andrew is a fully trained print journalist and has written for local newspapers, sports papers and various tech blogs. When he's not listening to endless amounts of promos, you'll find him wandering the streets of Manchester attending gigs, interviewing artists and trying to persuade techno enthusiasts about merits of melody.